• Westminster Bookstore

    Amazon Wish List
  • BibleWorks

Translation of the Didache 7

Per Dr. Black’s request, I have translated chapter 7 of the Didache. I’ve got to say, this one was really fun. It was a great topic and very interesting.

Remember, I’ve gone for a fairly literal translation (just fairly though). I’ve taken the extra step in a couple places here and there. I’ll let you be the judge of how I did in those spots though.

Greek

My Translation

Holmes’ Translation

1 Περὶ δὲ τοῦ βαπτίσματος οὕτω βαπτίσατε ταῦτα πάντα προειπόντες βαπτίσατε εἰς τὸ ὄνομα τοῦ πατρὸς καὶ τοῦ υἱοῦ καὶ τοῦ ἁγίου πνεύματος ἐν ὕδατι ζῶντι Now concerning the baptism, baptize in this way: after saying in advance all these things, baptize in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit in running water. Now concerning baptism, baptize as follows: after you have reviewed all these things, baptize in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit in running water.
2 ἐὰν δὲ μὴ ἔχῃς ὕδωρ ζῶν εἰς ἄλλο ὕδωρ βάπτισον εἰ δ᾽ οὐ δύνασαι ἐν ψυχρῷ ἐν θερμῷ But if you do not have running water, baptize in another kind of water; and if you are not able to have cold water, baptize in hot water. But if you have no running water, then baptize in some other water; and if you are not able to baptize in cold water, then do so in warm.
3 ἐὰν δὲ ἀμφότερα μὴ ἔχῃς ἔκχεον εἰς τὴν κεφαλὴν τρὶς ὕδωρ εἰς ὄνομα πατρὸς καὶ υἱοῦ καὶ ἁγίου πνεύματος But if you have neither, pour water on the head three times in the name of the Father and Son and Holy Spirit. But if you have neither, then pour water on the head three times in the name of the Father and Son and Holy Spirit.
4 πρὸ δὲ τοῦ βαπτίσματος προνηστευσάτω ὁ βαπτίζων καὶ ὁ βαπτιζόμενος καὶ εἴ τινες ἄλλοι δύνανται κελεύεις δὲ νηστεῦσαι τὸν βαπτιζόμενον πρὸ μιᾶς ἢ δύο Now, before the baptism, the one baptizing and the one being baptized, and if any others are able, let them fast! Now, you must urge the one being baptized to fast for one or two days before. And before the baptism let the one baptizing and the one who is to be baptized fast, as well as any others who are able. Also, you must instruct the one who is to be baptized to fast for one or two days beforehand.

So, questions? Comments? Death threats? Things you would change? Things you especially like? Lay them on me. Ok, maybe keep those threats to yourself.

MSE

Advertisements

10 Responses

  1. Looks great, Matt. I like how you put the exclamation mark after “let him fast” in v. 4. I wonder how that practice eventually became separated from baptism.

  2. I guess you can see even here a slight moving from the original apostolic message. I can remember Jesus or the Apostles calling for those who wish to be baptized to fast. Not that it is a problem per se but seems like an addition. Am I missing something?

    • I don’t think it was meant to be an addition exactly. Rather, from my limited knowledge of the Didache, I think it was supposed to be a helpful “teaching” that couldn’t hurt. Not sure though.

      Again, I wonder if Everett Ferguson touched on that. I may have to get his book just to find out.

  3. I looked up the fasting issue in Mckinion’s “Life and Practice.” According to him, fasting helped emphasize the communal aspect of baptism. When the community fasting along with the new believer, such helped show one’s entrance into the community of faith (Mckinion, 7). As time passed, the importance of baptism became its effects on the individual, with less of a focus on the community (Mckinion, 6), and the practice quickly disappeared.

  4. Do the death threats have to be related to the translation or can I make them for their own sake? In any case, great work on the translation.

    • I’m going to make a post sometime in the future just for the sake of threats toward my life. That is where you can post your hatred of me.

      Thanks for the compliment.

      And of course, that future post will NEVER happen. 😉

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: